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Monday, November 23

  1. page Tertiary Period edited Time Period: 65 Million years Ago to 2 Million years ago. At the beginning of the Tertiary Period…
    Time Period: 65 Million years Ago to 2 Million years ago.
    At the beginning of the Tertiary Period, North America and Europe were separated by a widening ocean basin spreading along a prominent mid-oceanic ridge. North America and South America were separated by a confluence of the future Pacific Ocean and Atlantic Ocean, and extensive flooding submerged much of what are now the eastern and middle portions of the United States. By the start of the Tertiary Period, water separated South America from Africa, and the Australian and Antarctic continents were clearly articulated. The Antarctic continent had begun a southward migration toward the south polar region. At the outset of the Tertiary Period, the Indian subcontinent remained far south of the Euro-Asiatic continent.

    {http://web.me.com/uriarte/Earths_Climate/4._Tertiary_Era_files/p48.jpg}
    By the middle of the Tertiary Period (approximately 30 mya), the modern continental arrangement was easily recognizable. Although still separated by water, the Central American land bridge between North and South America began to reemerge. Antarctica assumed a polar position and extensive ice accumulation began on the continent. The Indian plate drove rapidly northward of the equator to close with the Asiatic plate. Although still separated by a shallow strait of water, the impending collision of the plates that would eventually form the Himalayan mountain chain had begun. The gap between North America and Europe continued to widen at a site of sea-floor spreading along a prominent mid-Atlantic ridge. By the middle of the Tertiary Period, the mid-Atlantic ridge was apparent in a large suture-like extension into the rapidly widening South Atlantic Ocean that separates South America from Africa.
    {http://media-1.web.britannica.com/eb-media/43/136143-004-EA6CE8B3.gif}
    By the end of the Tertiary Period, approximately 2.6 mya, Earth's continents assumed their modern configuration. The Pacific Ocean separated Asia and Australia from North America and South America, just as the Atlantic Ocean separated North and South America from Europe (Eurasian plate) and Africa. The Indian Ocean washed between Africa, India, Asia, and Australia. The Indian plate driving against and under the Eurasian plate uplifted both, causing rapid mountain building. As a result of the ongoing collision, ancient oceanic crust bearing marine fossils was uplifted into the Himalayan chain.

    {http://www.paleoportal.org/media/boilerplate/0/15023_period_pal_map_8_image.jpg}
    Major Evolution Event:
    Climatic cooling increased at the end of the Tertiary Period, and modern glaciation patterns became well-established.
    Changes in Plants: Flowering plants became the dominant and most diverse vegetation during the Tertiary, such as the rose family.
    Similar to life in the oceans, the Tertiary also marks the first appearance of a very significant terrestrial ecosystem – the
    grassland.

    {http://waynesword.palomar.edu/images2/paphioped1b.jpg}
    Changes in Animals: On land, and in the air, the first representatives of many modern orders of birds evolved. The first ducks, owls, hawks and penguins made their first appearances during the Tertiary. Preceding the Tertiary, mammals were very limited in number and diversity. In large part this was due to the dominance of the dinosaurs. As the dinosaurs went extinct at the end of the Mesozoic, however, mammals began to diversify and radiate to fill niches left available by the dinosaurs. In fact, by the
    Oligocene (34 mya), most of the modern orders of mammals were present. Of the three main mammal lineages, the placental mammals became most dominant by the end of the period, outcompeting the monotremes and marsupials.
    .
    {http://www.imagesaustralia.com/koala450j.jpg}
    Mass Extinction Causes and the impact on life:
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Tuesday, March 6

  1. page Precambrian edited ... Genus: Anabaena Mass Extinction. Causes and Impacts on Life on Earth: ... largely affected…
    ...
    Genus: Anabaena
    Mass Extinction. Causes and Impacts on Life on Earth:
    ...
    largely affected StromatolitesStromatalites and Acritarchs,
    ...
    years ago because since all the land was stuck on one side no WARM water can cross over which caused the glaciation event but also where 70% of Precambrian flora and fauna perished in this extinction, but also gave diversity to the Vendian fauna which now resembles todays; Jellyfish,seapens, and segmented worms.
    {http://www.listoid.com/image/149/list_3_149_20101217_092746_414.jpg}

    Sources:
    Han, J., Kubota, S., Uchida, H., Stanley, G., Yao, X., Shu, D., Li, Y., & Yasui, K. (2010). Tiny Sea Anemone from the Lower Cambrian of China PLoS ONE, 5 (10) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0013276
    (view changes)
  2. page Carboniferous Period edited ... {http://images.nationalgeographic.com/wpf/media-live/photos/000/008/cache/carboniferous-landsc…
    ...
    {http://images.nationalgeographic.com/wpf/media-live/photos/000/008/cache/carboniferous-landscape_869_600x450.jpg}
    {http://cache2.artprintimages.com/lrg/38/3866/T25JF00Z.jpg}
    {http://www.paleoportal.org/media/boilerplate/0/21232_period_pal_map_12_image.jpg}
    (view changes)
    6:35 pm
  3. page Carboniferous Period edited ... Amphibians became widespread and diverse and reptiles appeared for the first time Mass Extinc…
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    Amphibians became widespread and diverse and reptiles appeared for the first time
    Mass ExtinctionCauses and Impacts on life on Earth
    ...
    filled air.
    Pictures
    {http://images.nationalgeographic.com/wpf/media-live/photos/000/008/cache/carboniferous-landscape_869_600x450.jpg}
    (view changes)
    6:27 pm
  4. page Carboniferous Period edited ... The Carboniferous Period ranged from 359.2 million years ago until 299 mllion years ago Chang…
    ...
    The Carboniferous Period ranged from 359.2 million years ago until 299 mllion years ago
    Changes in Continent
    Laurasia collided with Gondwana, closing the Tethys seaway between them
    Changes in Plants
    Vegetation thrived, coal forests became very known during the Carboniferous Period
    Changes in Animals
    Amphibians became widespread and diverse and reptiles appeared for the first time
    Mass ExtinctionCauses and Impacts on life on Earth
    The Carboniferous Period caused no mass extinctions. Life on earth thrived during this period and animals and plants adapted to the hot and coal filled air.
    Pictures
    {http://images.nationalgeographic.com/wpf/media-live/photos/000/008/cache/carboniferous-landscape_869_600x450.jpg}
    {http://cache2.artprintimages.com/lrg/38/3866/T25JF00Z.jpg}

    (view changes)
    6:22 pm
  5. page Precambrian edited ... Archaean Period: 4.6 billion yrs ago - 2.5 billion yrs ago Proterozoic Period: 2.5 billion yr…
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    Archaean Period: 4.6 billion yrs ago - 2.5 billion yrs ago
    Proterozoic Period: 2.5 billion yrs ago - 546 millon yrs ago
    {http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_F7i70fSPrGU/TCrEWEDRMoI/AAAAAAAAE5U/WRXvNdbDwkQ/s1600/fat-people-love-cookies.jpg}
    CHANGES IN CONTINENTS:
    {untitled.PNG}
    Major Evolutionary Events:
    A) Changes in plants:
    {journal.pone_.0013276.g001.png}
    Domain: Eukaryota
    Phylum: Eolympia
    Genus: pediculata

    B) Changes in Animals:
    {cyanobacteria188.jpg}
    ...
    Mass Extinction. Causes and Impacts on Life on Earth:
    The first extinction of the Precambrian, which largely affected Stromatolites and Acritarchs, has been correlated with a large glaciation event that occurred about 600 million years ago
    Sources:
    Han, J., Kubota, S., Uchida, H., Stanley, G., Yao, X., Shu, D., Li, Y., & Yasui, K. (2010). Tiny Sea Anemone from the Lower Cambrian of China PLoS ONE, 5 (10) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0013276
    National, G. (2011). National geographic. Retrieved from http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/prehistoric-world/precambrian/

    (view changes)
    6:10 pm
  6. page Permian edited ... Permian Period Time Period {http://theurbandaily.com/files/2010/05/batman-busted.jpg} Ti…
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    Permian Period
    Time Period
    {http://theurbandaily.com/files/2010/05/batman-busted.jpg}
    Time lasted: 290- 248 million years ago
    Changes in Continents
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  7. page Permian edited ... The Permian extinction was the biggest extinction that had ever occured on Earth. 95% of sea a…
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    The Permian extinction was the biggest extinction that had ever occured on Earth. 95% of sea animals were killed
    Smaller extinction of diapsids and synapsids cleared the way for other forms to dominate and led to the age of the dinosaurs!`
    www.rci.rutgers.edu/.../breakupframe.html
    http://www.prehistory.com/timeline/permian.htm
    "http://www.prehistory.com/timeline/permian.htm." N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Mar. 2012.
    {http://sfxhosted.exlibrisgroup.com/calvin?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft.aufirst=&rft.auinitm=&rft.aulast=&svc.fulltext=yes&sfx.response_type=image-large} Calvin College Hekman Library openURL resolver

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  8. page Carboniferous Period edited Time frame The Carboniferous Period ranged from 359.2 million years ago until 299 mllion years ag…
    Time frame
    The Carboniferous Period ranged from 359.2 million years ago until 299 mllion years ago
    Changes in Continent
    Laurasia

    (view changes)
    12:00 pm

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